Balancing Act

Balancing Act

This is a video exploring another side of the music of Mark Allan Wolfe. Noted for Rock, Indie, and New Age music, here is a cinematic piece. The song opens with soft piano, that is haunting and is joined by guitar and cello and culminates in a balancing act of a variety of musical instruments. The swelling of cymbals, orchestral elements, and traditional island percussion. For more music and licensing information please visit markallanwolfe.com
If you are interested in licensing music immediately you can start by visiting the online music licensing store located at
http://markallanwolfe.com/License Music.html

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Mixing Video Series: How to use Compression with the CA2A in SONAR X3

I use this software a lot and I found Cakewalk Sonar X3 to be one of the best recording software out there. You may like something different but this is a great tool for recording your music at home and in the studio

Mixing with Compression is an essential part to shaping and creating a great sounding track. In this video series I take you through a track-by-track video that shows you how to use compression on various types of instruments in SONAR X3 with the CA-2A T-Type Leveling Amplifier. You can use compression to control levels, enhance dynamics, and much more. Subscribe to our YouTube Channel and check out this series today.

 

Part 1 of 7 – Introducing the CA2A and all of it’s parameters in SONAR X3.

The CA2A is available separately on the Cakewalk Store

Check out SONAR X3: http://www.cakewalk.com/Products/SONAR/

Check out the CA2A Leveling Amplifier: http://www.cakewalk.com/products/CA-2A/

Tips on getting music placed and listened to

A lot of people email me and ask questions about how to get their music heard, do I have some time to listen and perhaps can I give them some advice? So I decided to put this together as a little posting to try to pass along some VERY IMPORTANT info. I hope it helps it is very basic but sometimes that is all that is needed to do. .

Do your research, find out what shows fit your music. Check the credits. Some of us may respond to Linkedin, Facebook, etc. If I have heavy metal or hard rock songs and cues I am not going to send them along to a show that primarily uses Hip Hop? or Reggae?

You may think this is silly that I say this but I cannot begin to tell you how many times I might post a listing or song search and I get back the totally opposite results. I will post something like I need Hip Hop, or Urban rap tune and someone will eventually send me a singer songwriter or jazz, even once I got a classical score piece. I am not mocking you or making fun of them for I have done that even in the past a long time ago but you need to do your research and find out what shows use what or what have they licensed before. Nothing will get the Music Supervisor to NOT listen to something more than when someone says, “I know your not looking for this at the moment but I feel this will be the best fit for your show…”  Not tripping but if the director wanted something other than what is listed we would have asked for it.

When sending someone an email asking them to listen to your music be sure you make the process as simple as possible. Links to stream with a link to download next to it. Keep it clean and accessible. Something like SoundCloud or Drop Box You Send it, Reverbnation EPK something easy.

Try to think of it like a million folks are trying to get the Music Supervisor or A&R agent to listen to their music. If the one listening needs to fill out forms or go searching on some website then that is NOT going to happen.

“What is the best way for me to get your attention to their music or take a moment to listen?” Be honest about presentation. Be professional yet humble. Try not to tell me you’re the NEXT so and so..Let your music and image do the talking. You maybe working out of a garage or a one room apartment or you may have a great band rocking out every night. THe thing is that if you have great music and great attitude you WILL be heard, your music WILL get you to where you need to be. Might take a while but it will. LOL

Finally BE ENCOURAGED!! and Keep on keeping on. No ONE believes more in your music than YOU! No one will promote it as hard, talk it up as much or try to sell it more.If you send a package out give it some time say 4-6 weeks. I cannot tell you how many times I might have sent something out and not heard nothing back then WHAM when you’re not thinking about it like sometimes months later you get the call, “We LOVE YOUR MUSIC!!” So just because someone does not call you or email you with in a month or so does not mean you’re not being heard.

We live in an age of FAST..somethings take time and for the RIGHT time. If you hold steady and do not quit and believe, make great music SOMEONE WILL notice.

With that I say CHEERS and have a safe summer, stay in touch.

Wolfie’s Music Publishing

The music players on here are from Wolfies Music Publishing and Mark Allan Wolfe

Music Production and Mastering Tips

As we gear up for this new year and start considering all the things we are getting involved in we wanted to share a few things with all of you that might help you all in your production and music creation.

Mastering is often considered to be something of a dark art, being thought of as almost unattainable. Although it is a complicated process it is not something that is not  unattainable and it is not an unlearn-able skill. A few places where you can find help would be ; Computer Music Has a bunch of tools available as well as a beginners’ guide to mastering. You can also visit http://www.recordingmag.com/ For a LOT of helpful tips and video links and articles to get you going.

Now, lets look at the things that we have found to be very helpful…..

Notch the kick

Try not to use shelving EQ to boost your kick. For you do this, and you are going to be boosting all the harmonics in there as well. Start by notching the EQ with in the freq of the Bass Drum, so you can just control the thud of the kick. I have found that if I just tweak the lower end of the EQ I can get that DEEP thud effect that hits you in the chest but sits right in the mix.

Ramp up the vocals

If the vocal track seems dry or is not cutting through, I will use EQ. I go to the center and add some mids in a bell shape all the while being mindful not to change the dynamic of the track. I boost around the 2, 2.7, 3kHz range , depending on the vocal tone. I will also use a mid/side processor to make the center channel louder or send it through a plug in that makes it spread out a bit I know I am weird but one thing is just because your plug in may have preset that says it is made or designed for this or that instrument does not always mean it is the best. Explore your sound and try to find those dynamics that make your track jump out and grab you by the throat and say “HEY LISTEN!” You understand do not limit yourself by what others put on you.

STAY BALANCED!

Now just because you may have these great tools and plug ins does not mean that you have to use them on everything. If the track or instrument is well-balanced, maybe you do not need a compressor. It is all about the gain structure and tone. You may want to turn your track up but you don’t want to ruin the vibe, so use wisdom. I always say STAY BALANCED Do not let your A.D.D get the best of you stay on track but at the same time explore your options. For some of the best tracks have been found totally by accident by exploring but you should always back up EVERYTHING and always save the original un the event you make a mistake.

Compression can affect the width

A narrow mix can be widened using mid/side processing, as compression and gain on the outer frequencies will accentuate them. Just be careful not to hid or cover up the important parts in the center, like bass and vocals. If your mix is too wide you may be able to bring it in by compressing the center signal, then raising its level back up. Always try to find a perfect place for every instrument, this is another beast all in itself though right?

Lower the output

When you are ready to make a mp3 from your mix you will get a better result by converting a WAV that has been mastered to a slightly lower output level than 0dB. Some engineers will recommends starting with a WAV that is about -0.5dB or -1.5db Try it out and see for yourself the difference is unbelievable.
If your mix is still some what not where you want it despite your best EQ efforts, you might want to try an exciter or enhancer. Where EQs can accentuate noise, and only amplify what’s already there. Exciters raise the harmonics of the fundamental tones found in the recording, brightening dull mixes. As with everything in mastering, though, don’t overdo it remember STAY BALANCED!
Do not forget to visit the websites and dign up for email list. Big news coming in a bit so if your looking to maybe find placements for your music be sure to stay connected. Things have been so busy it has been hard to stay up to date with everything. Please be patient.

Unreleased 1968 Jimi Hendrix Track, “Somewhere,”

This is an article from GuitarWorld.com I think jimi was absolutely one of the BEST guitar players of ROCK and Electric Blues ever but that is my opinion thought you might like to listen to this if your a fan as well. In a video posted last November, a clip of a “new” Hendrix track called “Somewhere” could be heard as engineer Eddie Kramer discussed the making of People, Hell & Angels, a collection of 12 previously unreleased studio recordings from the guitar legend.

Now the entire song — which features Buddy Miles and Stephen Stills — can be heard in full online. Stream it below via the video player.

Culled from the guitarist’s final recordings, the post-Experience material promises to veer in unexpected directions, even for diehard Hendrix fans. The collection, with a title coined by Hendrix, features a host of new collaborators for the guitar legend.

“We’re thrilled to be able to release People, Hell & Angels during the celebration of the 70th anniversary of my brother’s birth,” Janie Hendrix says. “The brilliance of the album serves to underscore what we’ve known all along: that there has never been and never will be a musical force equal to his and that we cherish and take inspiration of what he left us both now and for many generations to come … simply eternity.”

People, Hell & Angels is out March 5. I will also invite you to sample some of my music over at markallanwolfe.com you may like some of the tracks that are there which I was inspired by the man himself

NEW UPDATES

Hello everyone out there in TV land! Trust you all had a great thanksgiving time with those you love and care about. At the very least I trust that you took a moment out of your life to reflect on what you were thankful for.

I am just wanting to share a little info with you all. Made a lot of changes over at markallanwolfe.com I invite all of you to re visit and tell us what you think. There is a lot more info over there and a lot more on the way. For instance the new blog will be there and also Music 2 Sync will have a link thru there as well.

Which also leads me to share with you that we will be doing the same for Wolfies Music publishing main website as well Trying to get all the new things up and ready by the new year to start out fresh.

So if you have any ideas or thoughts about what you would like to see changed on our website feel free to share with us, maybe your ideas will go forwards. Tell us if there is something you would like to see come out of the new redo?

We just wanted to drop a quick story and say thanks for following and keeping in touch. Lets keep each other motivated to go on to bigger and better things.

Wolfies Music Publishing

Some Musical Business Terms

Good day my fellow musician and or music lover!

I was reviewing a few things with a client of mine the other day and I was sharing some basic terms often used with in the music business and I am one who is always endeavoring to learn and thought I might share a few terms with those of you who may just be starting out, or review for those of us who have been at this for some time.

I found some of these terms off of another website and felt that it would be fine to recycle some of these with the hopes of maybe encouraging those who take a few minutes to stay in touch. I will be adding more info and news updates very shortly once the ink is dry on a few agreements that are pending. I do hope you enjoy and feel free to share what ever you find here on this site and the others I own.

Music Administrator

Ostensibly, their duties should be to handle all the paperwork for the music supervisor and/or coordinator. In reality, they often have to handle a lot of the duties most often associated with being a supervisor and/or coordinator because of budget, time or personnel constraints. They may not be in the room as negotiations are in process, but after that meeting, you can bet that they’re the one who actually types up the contract!

Music Breakdown

While this can happen at the rough cut stage of a film, ideally the music supervisor is brought on before shooting, at which time they’ll read the script and note every place where music would be appropriate (i.e., club scene, romantic montage, car radio, etc.). This does NOT take the place of a spotting session (although it may include some ideas for where the bigger score pieces might work), but is merely a heads-up for the director with a ballpark idea of how many source cues might be needed and, perhaps, a rough budget. The supervisor will note the scene, type of music — or even a song title/artist if they have a specific song/recording in mind. They’ll also note how the music will be used (visual vocal — such as the band playing as everyone screams “Rock on!” — or background or whatever).

Music Clearance

Before using a piece of music and/or its recording in a film or TV program, it must be “cleared” with the respective publisher(s) and/or master rights holders. This means you need permission to use the music and/or its recording — and this means whether it’s “only” for a student film or festival uses, for TV (of any kind and anywhere), foreign or U.S. theatrical, or for Dolly Dinkle’s Dance Academy’s local cable ad. There are TWO parts of music clearance & licensing: A synchronization license is issued by the publisher for the use of the song/composition, and a master use license is issued by whoever holds the rights to the specific RECORDING of the song/composition. For famous/known copyrights and/or recordings get an expert or become one. It’s not brain surgery, but the ins-and-outs and “who knows who can get what at a good price and fast” can be really important — meaning you may get your “yes” or “no” answer in a couple of weeks as opposed to a couple of months. Suggestion? Go indie artist/label instead. They usually hold all rights to their own music and are more likely to make a deal that fits your budget. You’d be surprised at the variety of indie music available — it’s not all angsty chicks or moody dudes, but retro ’80s, big bands & 1940s swing, ’70s disco and old & new folk music from all around the world.

Music Coordinator

This differs greatly, depending on whether they’re on staff with a TV network or a full-service music company or an independent person who works with specific music supervisors. The Music Coordinator’s duties can be as simple as creating and filing cue sheets for the project and making sure all the dollars and cents add up at the end of the day, or may be as complex as working hand-in-hand with the music supervisor on all aspects of the project. Sometimes, if there is no supervisor, the Coordinator will work with the director and assume many of the duties a supervisor would normally handle. A Music Coordinator’s primary functions are normally to make sure the music the supervisor is suggesting for particular scenes is properly cataloged and delivered to the director, film editor and/or music editor (as directed), and all credit information (songwriters, artists, labels, etc.) is readily available. They are also responsible for coordinating the compilation of all information for cue sheet preparation, and may actually prepare the final cue sheets, based on the composer and music editor’s notes from the final mix of the film. Basically, the budget often dictates their duties.

Music Copyist (aka Copier, Music Preparer or Music Prep)

The Music Copyist (“Copier”) prepares the printed music charts and/or lead sheets the musicians use at a recording session. These are extracted from the overall music score the composer provides so that everyone is looking only at the part they play, and have their music in the right key for their instrument (kind of important). In the past (as those of us who had the stained fingers to prove it), such charts were done by hand, with India ink, and done one by one in a rather painstaking process. Today, with the advent of some great scoring software, those who prepare music for sessions most often will do it via the computer.

Music Editor

The Music Editor, along with the composer (and sometimes the music supervisor and/or coordinator) organizes, documents, and times all the music cues used in a project. He/She is the obsessive, retentive type and will often drive the director crazy with almost indistinguishable cuts in/out of a piece of music, but that’s why we love them. They will often make suggestions as to the best start/stop points, and can make a song “fit” into the scene, dodging dialogue and enhancing poignant moments by “cutting and pasting” a song. They also work with the composer on timing, length, type and placement of music that the director, composer and music supervisor have discussed during spotting sessions. If the music is being recorded live (not a Synth Score), the Music Editor will often be at recording sessions to document, time and name each cue, and will often generate the click used to keep everything exact. The Music Editor also cuts all music (source, score or source) into the film — although here is where the director and/or producer may return the “he/she’s driving me crazy” favor. The music editor also notes the correct SMPTE Time Codes for the cue’s in/out placement and provide that info to the music supervisor, coordinator and/or administrator so that official cue sheets can be prepared for filing with the respective performance rights organizations (PROs).

Music Publisher

A Music Publisher works with songwriters & composers to promote and market the writers’ songs/compositions. They pitch them to the folks who use music (movie/TV producers, record labels, video games, etc.). In return (and PLEASE NOTE: The Publisher will own this for the LIFE of the song/composition’s copyright — otherwise known as “in perpetuity”), the Publisher takes a percentage of the publishing half of a song (up to 100%). Publishers license the right to use the song (not to be confused with the recording of the song/composition), collect fees for the usage and split them with the songwriter/composer.

Music Supervisor

Regardless of whether they’re a “biggie” (meaning “I have a staff”) or an “indie” (“I get to do it all for less money”), the Music Supervisor’s main duty is in choosing music & licensing it for the project, and — as importantly — making sure the music they provide to the director/producer enhances the action/mood on screen, and helps the director/producer see their artistic vision realized. The Music Supervisor oversees all of the creative and business aspects of the music for a project. This includes helping to develop a music budget, assisting in the search for a composer, helping the director in his/her choice of songs, coordinating the soundtrack recording, “spotting sessions” (with composer & director), etc. It may or may not include doing the music clearance/music licensing paperwork, and can also include some (or all) of the duties of a music coordinator and/or music administrator. The earlier the Music Supervisor is involved, the more time they have to be creative — both with the music itself and with the budget. When a “famous” song, or a “classic copyright” is desired by a director, but the project’s budget does not allow for its use, the Supervisor will suggest (and often negotiate) budget-friendly alternatives from various sources, including independent artists and/or music libraries.

 

 

Tips for making better home recordings

Always experiment! The only way to know what sounds good in your home studio and what to avoid is to try different approaches to the same thing you have always done. So much of your ability to create comes from trial and error and constantly honing your ears and your technique. As well as your skills of engineering, producing, and listening to other recordings you have done. So do not be afraid or as I say LAZY to try new things you maybe surprised at what you find.

Markallanwolfe.com

markallanwolfe.com

Focus on your instrument.
If you’re a vocalist preparing to record, warm up and do your vocal exercises. Maybe a throat spray to lubricate your vocals will help (though be wary of the sprays that desensitize your throat). Wear a scarf around your neck for a couple of days prior to entering the studio to help keep your pipes warm. And just do the basic stuff (avoid smoking, no dairy) to keep your throat moist and phlegm free.

If you’re a guitar player, change your strings before going into the studio – especially if it’s an acoustic guitar. If you’re a bass player and you don’t change your strings once a month, you need to change those strings before you bring that bass into the studio. It’ll help the tone, the output, and you’ll stay in better tune.

If you’re a drummer, change the drum heads. If the heads have been on for too long, they’re going to sound dull and they’re not going to stay in tune. Also, take time to tune the drums correctly – you may even want to tune the drums differently for different songs.

Move around the room
Physically move the instrument or amplifier to different parts of the room. It can make a big difference in the tone you get. If you’re recording an acoustic guitar, violin, piano, sax, or any acoustic instrument, and you have it up against a wall with a lot of glass and wood, you’ll get a more reflective sound than if you’re up against a baffle. If you’re recording an amp, don’t just turn the amp on, stick a mic in front of it, and hit “record.” The amp can sound totally different in different parts of the room, so play around with different spots until you get the right tone for the track.

For any performer, vocalist or instrumentalist, lighting control can also help set a mood. Recording a slow, sultry track? Dim all the lights, light up a candle, and get in the groove.

Move around the room
Physically move the instrument or amplifier to different parts of the room. It can make a big difference in the tone you get. If you’re recording an acoustic guitar, violin, piano, sax, or any acoustic instrument, and you have it up against a wall with a lot of glass and wood, you’ll get a more reflective sound than if you’re up against a baffle. If you’re recording an amp, don’t just turn the amp on, stick a mic in front of it, and hit “record.” The amp can sound totally different in different parts of the room, so play around with different spots until you get the right tone for the track.
Angle your amp
Raising an amp off the ground or angling it so the face of the amp is at 45 degrees can have dramatic effects, depending on the room and the amp. If you’re angling the amp, essentially you’re decoupling the amp from the floor. The floor may be wood, and it may have a resonant cavity below it that’s sucking away your low end, or adding more low end because it’s vibrating. By pulling the amp off the floor, you’re decoupling it. Even if you’re angling it, only part of the amp is touching the floor, so you’re basically removing the floor from the equation in terms of the tone you’re getting.Also, if you have an amp perpendicular to the floor, all the energy is going forward, and low to the ground. Let’s say you’ve got an 8′ ceiling. You’ve got many more options if the amp is kicked up at a 45º angle. Now you can put a mic up in the corner to get a little more of the room. If you’re going for a really tight sound, you might just want to leave it on the floor. Remember, in a studio they’re going to have a dead floor. They’ll have that under control so you wont have these pockets of resonance under the floor. Chances are, your home studio won’t be as predictable.

Mixing board

mixing board

Play with mic placement and angles
Mic placement and mic angles go a long way toward capturing different tones from the same source. For example, to help record a very sibilant vocal performer, try angling the mic up toward a 45º angle and you might find a lot of that popping and hissing goes away.

Mic placement

It’s been said before, but bears repeating—the best way to find the optimum placement of a microphone is to find the spot where the instrument sounds best. Do this by putting a finger in one ear and listening to the instrument with the other, moving around until you find the spot where it sounds best to you. Then put a mic in that spot.

I rarely use eq when tracking acoustics—so many tones can be achieved by placing the right microphone in the right spot that electronic equalization is usually unnecessary. For example, you might put a microphone 6 to 8 inches from the guitar, pointing at the neck about mid-way between the sound hole and the 12th fret.

When you listen to the signal, you may decide that the mic is picking up too much of the guitar’s low end—it sounds boomy. If this is the case, you could either point the mic farther up the neck and away from the sound hole (where a lot of the low end comes from), or you could pull the mic back another 6 or 8 inches (which will lessen the proximity effect of the mic). If the sound of the mic is too bright, you can move the mic closer to the sound hole or closer to the instrument. This isn’t an either/or choice; the character of the low end created by proximity effect is different from that attained by moving the mic closer to the sound hole.

Another approach is to use the off-axis frequency response of a mic to your advantage. Earlier I mentioned that cardioid microphones are more sensitive to sounds coming from in front than from the side; that’s true as an average, but many microphones exhibit a decreased sensitivity to certain frequencies as the source is moved off axis (that is, away from the front of the capsule). As an example, at 30 degrees off axis, a specific mic may be 2 dB less sensitive at 1 kHz, and 4 dB less sensitive at 10 kHz. For the user, this means that one way to change the sound captured by that mic would be to point it slightly away from the sound source.

Studio Mic

Studio Mic

Using Mic patterns to your advantage

Most microphones sold these days have a cardioid pickup pattern, which means that the mic is most sensitive to sounds coming from in front of the capsule, and is less sensitive to sounds coming from the sides and the rear. Most cardioid mics have a pronounced proximity effect, which means that the low end response of the mic is increased as it is moved closer to the sound source. But don’t forget that both omnidirectional mics (which are sensitive to sounds coming from all directions) and figure 8 mics (bi-directional mics which are more sensitive from the front and back and less sensitive to sounds coming from the sides) can be enormously useful, as I’ll detail in a bit.

Studio ambiance

You know, we’ve all read about those singers who recorded their hit song while surrounded by their necessities—their lava lamps, their incense, their ginseng tea and their aromatherapy candles; they want the darkened room, along with (I suppose) their bunny slippers, their spiritual adviser and the studio to be at 71.5 degrees and 42% humidity. Although this is cool to a degree somethings need to be and others are just personal preference. like if your just recording the music portion then yes I totally dig the whole lava lamps and stuff. I have them as well as different things to help stimulate the whole atmosphere.

With the singer I want light—enough light so that the singer can see their words, and, if they’re singing with a band, enough light so that all concerned can see each other. I’ve never been able to see that building a womb for the singer results in a performance any better than their performance while standing in the middle of a well-lit recording studio.

During the course of my years of recording I have taken a slightly different approach to things by experimenting in many different ways and encourage you to do the same.  I have sang and recorded my guitar in closets, bedrooms, laundry rooms and bathrooms. And you know what? They sounded great! I pretty much make sure that the vocalist has someplace to set their water (tea, coffee, or whatever), a music stand, a chair to sit on while they listen to playbacks, and off we go. Don’t misunderstand, though—I will try to make myself comfortable, but I have never seen the need to be straight by the book always. Sometimes the best recordings come by accident as well.

I will post more on this subject as time goes by, in the meantime I would be thankful for you to share some of your experiences if you would? What works for you? Where have you found the best ideas that work? Why not share them with the world for maybe someone can benefit from your experiment make a hit record and owe it all to you. Also all of the tracks submitted on this blog were recorded in my home studio,

Mark Allan Wolfe–www.markallanwolfe.com —wolfiesmusicpublishing.com

Mark Allan Wolfe

Mark Allan Wolfe

ASCAP Initiates Multiple Infringement Actions Against Nightclubs, Bars & Restaurants to Heighten Awareness About Performing Copyrighted Music Without Permission

NEW YORK, NY, Jun 25, 2012 (MARKETWIRE via COMTEX) — The American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP) announced today that it has filed multiple infringement actions against nightclubs, bars and restaurants in several states across the nation.

In each of the cases filed today, the business or establishment has publicly performed the copyrighted musical works of ASCAP’s songwriter, composer and music publisher members without obtaining a license from ASCAP to do so. These establishments then refused to acquire a license and continued to perform ASCAP members’ music without permission, resulting in the filing of the infringement actions.

ASCAP manages the rights of its members by licensing and distributing royalties for the non-dramatic public performances of their copyrighted works. Those licensed by ASCAP include any establishment or business that wants to perform copyrighted music publicly.

“Music plays a crucial role in attracting customers to restaurants, bars and various other establishments. Our membership of songwriters and composers are, in essence, small business people, who must invest in the tools of the trade that allow them to create music the world loves. They deserve to be fairly compensated when others benefit from the fruits of their labor and talent,” said Vincent Candilora, ASCAP Executive Vice President of Licensing. “It is both ASCAP’s right and responsibility to collect licensing fees from these venues in order to protect the livelihoods of our members.”

Any business using copyrighted music has the opportunity to obtain permission to do so lawfully, through acceptance of a license covering the use of the more than 8.5 million copyrighted songs and compositions in the ASCAP repertory. Nearly 90% of the license fees ASCAP collects are paid as royalties directly to songwriters, composers and music publishers. The balance covers ASCAP’s operating costs, which are among the lowest of any performance rights organization in the world.

“ASCAP only takes legal action as a last resort — after several attempts to provide the necessary permission have failed,” added Candilora. “Like a liquor license, establishments require a license to play copyrighted music. This is a basic cost of business recognized in hundreds of thousands of venues across the country. By filing these cases today, we hope to raise awareness among music users and the public that it is a Federal offense to perform copyrighted music without permission.”

Frequently Asked Questions about licensing can be found on ASCAP’s website at http://www.ascap.com/licensing/licensingfaq.html .

The establishments that have performed publicly the copyrighted musical works of ASCAP’s songwriter, composer and music publisher members without receiving their permission to do so, resulting in lost income for these music creators, include:

Establishment, City, State Anthony’s Lounge & Ristorante, Murrieta, CA Romeo Cucina, Laguna Beach, CA Smuggler’s Bay Restaurant, Fort Lauderdale, FL Younger’s Irish Tavern, Romeo, MI Coyote’s, Hillsboro, OR Bud’s Sports Bar, Chattanooga, TN Ixonia Pub, Ixonia, WI

About ASCAP Established in 1914, ASCAP is the first and leading U.S. Performing Rights Organization (PRO) representing the world’s largest repertory totaling over 8.5 million copyrighted musical works of every style and genre from more than 435,000 songwriter, composer and music publisher members. ASCAP has representation arrangements with similar foreign organizations so that the ASCAP repertory is represented in nearly every country around the world where copyright law exists. ASCAP protects the rights of its members and foreign affiliates by licensing the public performances of their copyrighted works and distributing royalties based upon surveyed performances. ASCAP is the only American PRO owned and governed by its writer and publisher members. For more information, please visit http://www.ascap.com .

        
        Press Contacts
        Tim Hayes
        ASCAP
        (212) 621-8414
        thayes@ascap.com

        Bobbi Marcus
        Bobbi Marcus PR & Events, Inc.
        (310) 889-9200
        bobbi.marcus@bobbimarcuspr.com 

SOURCE: ASCAP

Ideas to help in your music career?

Hello again everyone, here are a few ideas that I recently shared with a few people looking to broaden their horizons and are pursuing a career in music. I thought wow I should share these thoughts with all of you as well, maybe you already know these, maybe you do not but felt it worth the time for many people who contact me do not have some of these basic concepts down and wonder why things do not change. So lets dig on in.

As I try to move ahead in this wonderful world of music I have discovered some basic truths that if put into practice will help you immensely, if left behind or laid aside can hinder you in your progress.

Website

First you need to have some form of website or web presence in these days. If you are going to make any headway or gain some popularity you MUST have a website. They do not have from your wallet.e to be something costing millions of dollars but you need to have a .com It is a place for your fans to connect with you, a place to share links,videos band news, etc. Now I have listed a few examples to just show you of what I mean. You can have  have a FACEBOOK personal page BAND page or a MYSPACE page but always in the end you need to have your own little corner in the world that is your place, something like www.markallanwolfe.com

For something like your own URL (which is like your band name) it only cost a little bit of cash so it is not something that might break you. You can start here for possible URL. One thing I remember someone telling me early on was you need to spend a little money to make some money. so do not fear but also use extreme caution for their are folks out there who will take advantage and try to squeeze out as much as they can.

Why the need to get all of these places out there? Because part of this game called the MUSIC BUSINESS is the key word in that, BUSINESS! You thought well if I just make the music and tell people about it they will flock to me and demand, “DUDE! play on!” Just like in any other Business you will have to earn customers and build a name for yourself. The days of when you just had to play a song for someone and they would give you money to get a record deal, were blown away and wanted to make you a star are almost gone. There are times when some one comes along but even THEY need a place to start.

The music business has changed so much over the past few years that what was once a elite club to get into, is still somewhat elite, yet you have a better chance at getting to your set goals then before all because of the INTERNET. Which leads me to my next little step.

GOALS

You need to take sometime out to write out all that your looking for and what your trying to accomplish. For with out having a game plan your DOOMED to fail.As trivial as this sounds do not make haste at it. For what company ever succeeded without first having a goal to reach for. They can be anything you want but you need to devise a plan. That way when the time gets hard, and they will, you have something to go back to. When things seem to be going great and your head is int he clouds you can always comeback to your list to see if this is something that you wanted

I know many of you will probably read half way thru and turn away at some of these thoughts, but ask yourself this question, do you think Henry Ford just got together with those around him and said, “I am going to make a product that the WHOLE world will want to buy, that will make me billions, and change the WORLD!” I just want you bankers to give me all the money I need on this horseless carriage, (what cars were first called), NO!

He had to develop a plan and stick to it, by doing that as you can see they have been around for over 100 yrs if I am not mistaken.  You say, “Wolfie , dude that is cars this is different” How so? You want to change the world with your music, you need money form folks to help you realize this dream of yours. You need to surround yourself with those of like mind to achieve the goals you have set out for yourself. No matter if your looking to be the next best thing in music, acting, or any other business you NEED a plan that is solid. Nothing wrong with writing your dreams and goals out. It can be something as well to go back to when everyone around you thinks your crazy and a fool that you wont get it, it will never work. You can read your own words and find strength and comfort knowing YOU will make it if you faint NOT.

I will share a few more ideas perhaps tomorrow but definitely soon. I want you to be encouraged in this dream of yours. It is something that is birthed in your heart since who knows when. NO ONE loves your music MORE than YOU. Friends will not, family will not, your neighbors wont, only YOU. You need to believe in yourself a 120% all the time and you will make it. That is if you have got the talent, and determination. LOL Look at it like a marathon race of 26 miles. Many people will stop after 10-15 miles, faint after 20-25 but people who run say that after they hit the wall they STILL move on past it like they still have ANOTHER 26 miles to go. If you stop to look to your left or right your going to get tripped up and fail. DO NOT STOP KEEP MOVING! Wow I think I encouraged myself today.  :o)

More next time.